30.5.16

Dubov's See Saw

16.5.16

Tricks and Traps in the Opening London System

The European Individual Championship is in progress in Gjakova, Kosovo. Round four was played yesterday and as usual, the event offers high-quality chess.
The clashes in round one though usually have a different flavor. The thing is that at these events the top players have much lower opposition at the beginning.
This is a good occasion for a miniature that can get easily into the "Tricks and traps in the Openings" section.
Enjoy the shortest game of the EICC:

27.4.16

USA Championships

The USA championships finished yesterday in Saint Louis. There was no need of tie-breaks in both the events. In the men's part Fabiano Caruana proved superior to the field, scoring 8.5/11, a clear point ahead of his closest rivals Wesley So and Hikaru Nakamura.
One of the important games of the event was played in round three:
A game that I liked (ChessBase 13)

[Event "U.S. Championship 2016"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2016.04.16"]
[Round "3.1"]
[White "So, Wesley"]
[Black "Caruana, Fabiano"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[WhiteElo "2773"]
[BlackElo "2795"]
[Annotator "Bojkov, Dejan"]
[PlyCount "184"]
[EventDate "2016.??.??"]
[WhiteClock "0:06:48"]
[BlackClock "0:07:21"]

1. c4 c5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nc3 Nc6 4. e3 e6 5. d4 d5 6. a3 a6 7. dxc5 Bxc5 8. b4
Bd6 9. Bb2 O-O 10. cxd5 exd5 {[%csl Yd5] Diagram [#] A typical picture for the
Semi-Tarrasch. The isolated pawn on d5 might be both strenght and weakness.}
11. Be2 Be6 12. O-O Qe7 {Intending both Ra8-c8 and Rf8-d8. And something more.}
({Another way to play it is the immediate} 12... Rc8 {which gives an
additional option of Bd6-b8 followed by battery on the h2-b8 diagonal. This
however also leaves more options to White.} 13. Rc1 Qe7 14. Qd3 (14. Na4 {
is the other idea.}) 14... Rfd8 15. Rfd1 b5 {Le,Q (2703)-Pelletier,Y (2587)
Belfort 2012}) 13. Rc1 {Intending Nc3-a4-c5. But now Black reveals the other
ideabehind his Qd8-e7 maneuver.} a5 {[%csl Ya3][%cal Ga1c1] Diagram [#] The
pawn on a3 was left loose and Caruana makes use of it.} (13... Rfd8 14. Na4 Ne4
15. Nd4 Nxd4 16. Qxd4 $14 {led to a typical slightly better position for White
in Guimard,C (2410)-Agdamus,J (2200) Santos Lugares 1977}) 14. Nb5 $146 {
So sacrifices a pawn for initiative. A predecessor saw} (14. b5 Ne5 (14... Nb8
$5 {is another route to d7.}) 15. Qa4 Ned7 {and White had problems with his
queenside, Lee,F-Sergeant,E Scarborough 1909}) 14... axb4 (14... Bb8 15. bxa5
Nxa5 16. Nbd4 {is good for White.}) 15. Nxd6 Qxd6 16. axb4 Qxb4 17. Bxf6 gxf6
18. Rb1 Qe7 19. Rb5 {[%csl Yb7,Yd5,Yf6,Yf7,Yh7] Diagram [#] As a result White
managed to destroy all the black pawns and he may try to profit from this in
two ways- attack the weaken kingside or patiently try to harvest all the crop.
The problem with the latter is that if he even wins both "b" and "d" pawns
(for free) he will have to trade some pieces and there is a very good chance
that Black reaches an endgame four versus three on the same flank which is an
easy draw. In fact, the presence of double "f" pawns makes the draw easier!}
Rfd8 20. Nd4 {Nothing gives:} (20. Qb1 d4 21. Rxb7 Qa3 22. Nxd4 Nxd4 23. exd4
Rxd4 $11) 20... Kg7 21. Re1 {In the light of the above-mentioned I have the
feeling that White should have tried to play for more with} (21. Bd3 Nxd4 22.
exd4 {although I do not really see a way for White to capture both "b" and "d"
pawns for free.}) 21... Nxd4 22. Qxd4 Bf5 $1 {[%csl Gg7][%cal Gf5g6,Rb7b5,
Rb5b4,Rb4b3,Rb3b2,Rb2b1] Diagram [#] Now Caruana practically takes away the
loss as a possible result from the board. The only one who can play for the
win in the endgame is black.} 23. Rxd5 Rxd5 24. Qxd5 Be4 25. Qd1 Qb4 26. Rf1
Ra2 27. Qd7 {There are still problems for White in the line:} (27. Bf3 b5 28.
Bxe4 Qxe4 29. Qb3 Qa4 30. Qd5 Ra1 $15) 27... Bg6 {The position of the black
king is secured and the "b" pawn is quite fearsome thanks to the support of
all the black pieces.} 28. Bf3 b5 29. h4 $1 {[%csl Yg7][%cal Gh4h5] Diagram [#]
So tries to open the king again to saveguard a draw.} (29. Bc6 Rb2 {followed
by Rb2-b1 seems bad for White.}) 29... Rd2 (29... Qxh4 30. Qxb5 $11) 30. Qh3 h5
31. Qg3 ({Black still pushing after} 31. g4 hxg4 32. Bxg4 Qc5 (32... Be4) (
32... Kh6)) 31... Qd6 {In the coming time trouble Caruana decided to
completely secure himself. In the line} (31... Qc5 32. Ra1 b4 33. Qb8 b3 $4 34.
Ra8 {Black gets under mating attack all of a sudden.}) 32. Qxd6 Rxd6 33. Rd1
Rb6 {Black's active pieces are his main advantage.} (33... Rxd1+ 34. Bxd1 {
is a draw.}) 34. e4 {Since the bishop cannot be blocked, it made sense to
bring the white one out first with} (34. Bd5 $5 b4 35. Bb3 Rc6 36. Rd4 Rc1+ 37.
Kh2 Rb1 38. Bd5 ({Not} 38. Rxb4 Bc2) 38... Rb2 ({And not} 38... b3 $2 39. Rb4
b2 40. Ba2) 39. Kg3 Bf5 $11) 34... b4 35. Rd2 f5 36. exf5 Bxf5 37. Bxh5 b3 38.
Rb2 Bc2 {[%csl Yb2][%cal Rb6a6,Ra6a2,Ra2b2] Diagram [#] The white rook is
trapped and Black intends Rb6-a6-a2 trapping it.} 39. Bf3 (39. Kf1 $2 {loses to
} Ra6) (39. Be2 Rb4 {will win the pawn easier.}) 39... Rb5 $1 {A clever way to
win the "h" pawn.} (39... Ra6 40. Bd5 {gves nothing to Black here.}) 40. Be2
Rb4 41. Bf3 Rxh4 42. Bd5 Rb4 {Caruana won the pawn back and managed to keep
the rook on b2 locked, but the reduced material allows a chance to So to
defend.} 43. Kf1 f5 44. Ke2 Kf6 45. f4 $1 {[%csl Yf5][%cal Gg2g4] Diagram [#]
Stops the black king and fixes the pawn on f5 in order to swap it off.} Ke7 (
45... Rxf4 46. Bxb3 $11) 46. Bg8 Kf8 47. Bd5 Kg7 48. Ke3 (48. g3 {is also
possible.}) 48... Kg6 49. Bf3 Kf6 50. Bd5 {So is patient and this is good. The
hasty} (50. g4 $6 {leads to trouble after} fxg4 51. Bxg4 Re4+ 52. Kf3 $2 Ra4 $1
$19) 50... Kg6 51. Bf3 Rc4 52. g4 {Diagram [#] Now it is good. Although White
can also hold after} (52. Bd5 Rc3+ 53. Kd4 Rd3+ 54. Ke5) 52... Rc3+ 53. Kf2 Bd3
54. Bd1 Bc4 55. Ke1 Rg3 (55... fxg4 56. Bxg4 Rg3 57. Bd1 {would be similar to
the game.}) 56. Kf2 Rh3 57. Ke1 Be6 58. Re2 (58. gxf5+ Kxf5 59. Kd2 {should be
OK too.}) 58... Bc4 59. Rb2 Kf6 60. Kd2 Rd3+ 61. Kc1 Rc3+ 62. Kd2 Rg3 63. gxf5
Kxf5 64. Kc1 Kxf4 65. Rh2 Ke3 66. Kb2 {Now that the king made it to the "b"
pawn the draw is unavoidable.} Kd4 67. Rh4+ Kc5 68. Ka3 Bd5 69. Rh5 Kd4 70.
Rxd5+ {Diagram [#] Stirring the game into theoretical draw. The white king is
where it is needed-in the correct corner.} Kxd5 71. Bxb3+ Kd4 72. Kb2 Rg2+ 73.
Ka1 Kc3 74. Ba2 Rg7 75. Bb1 Rb7 76. Ba2 Kc2 77. Bd5 {The only danger for the
defender in this endgame is to keep his bishop too close to the enemy king.} (
77. Bc4 $4 Rb1+ 78. Ka2 Rb4 {[%csl Rc2,Yc4,Rd3][%cal Rc4d3] Diagram [#] loses
only because the white bishop cannot give a check to the black king.}) 77...
Re7 (77... Rb1+ 78. Ka2 Rb5 79. Be4+ $11 {is the crucial difference in
comparison to the previous line.}) 78. Bg8 Re1+ 79. Ka2 Rh1 80. Bd5 Rh4 81.
Bb3+ Kc3 82. Be6 Rf4 83. Bg8 Rf2+ 84. Kb1 Rb2+ 85. Ka1 Kc2 86. Bh7+ Kc1 87. Bg8
Rb1+ 88. Ka2 Rb8 89. Bf7 Rb2+ 90. Ka1 Rb7 91. Bd5 Ra7+ 92. Ba2 Kc2 {Diagram [#]
} 1/2-1/2



Report.

31.3.16

Tricks and Traps in the Opening QID

A couple of weeks ago when browsing through the live tournaments I bumped into this short game played by a former teammate of mine.
The Queens Indian Defense has a reputation of very solid opening, especially from White's perspective.
Still miniatures are possible and one should be very careful not to violate the opening principles. In particular- to try and hide his/her king as quick as possible.

24.3.16

Modern Chess 2

As I promised you a month ago, here comes the second part of the wonderful course by GM Gavrikov about the isolated pawn for "Modern Chess".
“Modern chess” is a magazine of educational type, publishing Grandmaster’s lectures concerning all the stages of the chess game – opening, middlegame and endgame. The articles are interrelated, each one of them being a part of a comprehensive course on a specific topic. Besides the opportunity to read the magazine in PDF, you are offered an interactive version, accessible from the web site.
Therefore, “Modern chess” is a digital educational platform, suitable for anyone who has the ambition to improve his knowledge on the chess game. For more information about Modern Chess Magazine, please visit it here.
We now continue with the typical plans for the side owing the isolani:
A game that I liked (ChessBase 13)

[Event "Nottingham"]
[Site "Nottingham"]
[Date "1936.08.25"]
[Round "13"]
[White "Botvinnik, Mikhail"]
[Black "Vidmar, Milan Sr"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "D40"]
[Annotator "GM Viktor Gavrikov"]
[PlyCount "47"]
[EventDate "1936.08.10"]
[EventRounds "15"]
[EventCountry "ENG"]

{2) Advance of the "f" pawn The advance of the "f" pawn is another standard
approach in positions with an isolated queen's pawn. In order to make easier
the understanding of this idea, I can make a parallel with the knight
sacrifice on "f7" which was examined in our previous article. As some of you
may recall, there are three necessary condition to make a knight sacrifice on
"f7" - White's white-squared bishop must be on the "a2 - g8" diagonal, Black's
white-squared bishop must not be on the "c8 - h3" diagonal and there must be a
considerable pressure along the "e" file. However, sometimes only the first
two conditions are met ( very often the rook is not on "e1", but on "f1"). In
such situations, the side which plays with "isolani" can't sacrifice his
knight on "f7", because there are is no pressure allong the "e" file. In this
type of positions, the idea to advance the "f" pawn by f2-f4-f5 becomes very
attractive. This idea has two main goals: - activate the rook on "f1" - weaken
the "a2-g8" diagonal On of the biggest advocates of the plan connected with
the "f" pawn advance is the creator of the Soviet chess school, the World
champion Mikhail Botvinnik. As an example, I am going to examine one of his
games in which he executed the abovementioned plan in a very instructive
manner.} 1. c4 e6 2. Nf3 d5 3. d4 Nf6 4. Bg5 Be7 5. Nc3 O-O 6. e3 Nbd7 7. Bd3
c5 8. O-O cxd4 9. exd4 dxc4 10. Bxc4 Nb6 11. Bb3 Bd7 12. Qd3 {[%cal Ga1d1,
Gf3e5,Gd3h3,Gb3c2] Diagram [#] Mikhail Botvinnik goes for his favourite plan
in such kind of positions - Ne5, Bc2 and Qh3. Black has to be very precise, in
order not to find himself in a big trouble.} Nbd5 {It's understandable that
Black want's to block the "d4" pawn as soon as possible. However, his last
move is not flexible enoughe, because by playing in this way, he shows his
cards too early. Now, nothing can stop White from building his attack on the
kingside.} ({Black could have tried the move} 12... Bc6 {, but even in this
case, he doesn't manage to solve his problems. Let's see how the game could
continue:} 13. Bc2 g6 14. Ne5 Rc8 15. Rad1 a6 16. Rfe1 Nbd5 {Diagram [#]} 17.
Bb3 $1 {A key move! Remember that when your opponent closes the "b1 - h7"
diagonal by means of g7-g6, your light-squared bishop must be relocated to the
"a2 - g8" diagonal.} b5 18. Qh3 {[%cal Gg5h6,Ge5f7] Diagram [#] The queen
occupies it's optimal position. Now, as you can easily see, all the conditions
for a knight sacrifice on "f7" are met - White's light-squared bishop is
situated on the important "a2 - g8" diagonal, while Black's light-squared
bishop is not on the diagonal "c8 - h3". Moreover, the pressure along the "e"
file is very strong. Now, white is threatening to play 19.Bh6 followed by N:f7
and Q:e6. Here, I would like to bring to your attention some possible lines
which illustrate White's attacking ressources in such kind of positions.} Qd6 {
This move is designed to parry White's direct threats. Even though, given the
fact that White is ahead in development and his peaces are more active, he
could go for a symmetrical pawn structure. Also, the weakened Black's kingside
favours this transition.} ({The move} 18... Bb7 $2 {loses on the spot, because
of} 19. Bh6 Re8 $140 20. Nxf7 $18) ({Now, after the careless} 18... Nxc3 $2 19.
bxc3 Bd5 20. Bh6 Re8 {White has at his disposal an original mating idea:} 21.
Nxf7 $1 Kxf7 $140 $2 22. Qxe6+ Bxe6 23. Bxe6# {Diagram [#]}) 19. Nxc6 Rxc6 20.
Nxd5 exd5 (20... Nxd5 $2 21. Bxd5) 21. Re5 {White has a pair of bishops,
controls the open "e" file and exercises a considerable pressure against the
weak "d5" pawn. His advantage is undisputable.}) ({The move} 12... Nfd5 {
is clearly better. Black tries to exchange as much pieces as possible.}) 13.
Ne5 Bc6 14. Rad1 Nb4 ({Even in this position, Black could have tried to
provoke some exchanges, but White is still able to go for a favourable version
of the symmetrical pawn structure:} 14... Nh5 15. Bxd5 Bxd5 16. Bxe7 Qxe7 17.
Nxd5 exd5 18. Rfe1 $14 {Diagram [#] Diagram [#] Despite of the simplifications,
white retains some edge due to the activity of his peaces.}) 15. Qh3 Bd5 ({
Now, the move} 15... Nfd5 {could be met by} 16. Bc1 {Diagram [#] In this
position, the awkwardly placed "Nb4" makes Black's life difficult. At the same
time, White is very well prepared for the advance of his "f" pawn - he
controls the "a2 - g8" diagonal, whereas Black's light-squared bishop is not
on the "c8-h3" diagonal.}) 16. Nxd5 Nbxd5 {Diagram [#] Diagram [#] The
exchange of the light-squared bishops always favours white. It's important to
point out that when black's light-squared bishop is not on the board, the
advance of the "f" pawn becomes much more dangerous, because after the
weakening} 17. f4 $1 {Diagram [#] Now, the f4-f5 threat becomes obvious.} Rc8 (
{The move} 17... g6 $2 {Loses on the spot, because of} 18. Bh6 Re8 19. Ba4 $18)
({White is winning effectively.} 17... Ne4 $2 18. Nxf7 $1 Kxf7 (18... Rxf7 19.
Qxe6 $18) 19. Rde1 $18) 18. f5 exf5 $2 {After this move, White's attack is
unstoppable.} ({Even though, their position is already very difficult, Black
should have played} 18... Qd6 $16) 19. Rxf5 Qd6 $2 {Last mistake in a
difficult position. However, we can hardly come up with a better suggestion.} (
19... Rc7 20. Rdf1 a6 $140 $2 (20... Nb6 21. Be3 (21. Qh4) 21... Qd6 $140 $2
22. Qg3 $18 {[%cal Ge3h6] Diagram [#]}) 21. Nxf7 $1 Rxf7 22. Bxd5 Nxd5 23. Rxf7
Bxg5 24. Qe6 $18) 20. Nxf7 $1 {Diagram [#] After this effective strike, the
game is over.} Rxf7 21. Bxf6 Bxf6 (21... Nxf6 22. Rxf6 $18 {[%cal Gh3c8]
Diagram [#]}) 22. Rxd5 Qc6 23. Rd6 Qe8 24. Rd7 1-0



The next plan is the advance of the "h" pawn:
A game that I liked (ChessBase 13)

[Event "URS-ch FL"]
[Site "Yerevan"]
[Date "1955.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Kotov, Alexander"]
[Black "Khalilbeili, Sultan"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "E57"]
[Annotator "GM Viktor Gavrikov"]
[SetUp "1"]
[FEN "r1bq1rk1/1p2nppp/p3pb2/8/3PQB2/P4N2/BP3PPP/3R1RK1 w - - 0 17"]
[PlyCount "51"]
[EventDate "1955.??.??"]
[EventRounds "21"]
[EventCountry "URS"]

{Diagram [#] 3) Advance of the "h" pawn As the reader already knows, when we
play with an isolani, our long-term plan is to launch a kingside attack. In
some positions, however, despite of the fact that our pieces are transferred
to the kingside, we don't manage to create any serious threats against the
opponent's king. Most often, this is explained by the lack of weaknesses in
our opponent's camp. A classical way to deal with a pawn fortress is to strike
with our own pawns. In this line of thoughts, the only pawn that we can
advance, without exposing our king to possible dangers, is the "h" pawn. Very
often this pawn is some kind of "kamikaze" that sacrifices his life in order
to clear the way for the other pieces. It's important to mention that the
march of the "h" pawn is much more effective when our opponeng had already
played the move g7-g6. Generally, we can provoke that advance by putting our
queen and bishop on the "b1 - h7" diagonal. All the typical attacking ideas
connected with the advance of the "h" pawn are perfectly illustrated in the
classical game "Alexander Kotov - Sultan Khalilbeili played in 1955. In the
diagram position, White can't make use of the typical ideas that we have
already examined. Moreover, I don't see a way to increase the pressure created
by our pieces. That's why Kotov decides to go for the advance of his "h" pawn.
} 17. h4 $1 Bd7 18. Bb1 $1 {[%csl Rh7] Diagram [#] Diagram [#] A very precise
move! As I have already mentionned, White tries to provoke the move g7-g6
after which his "h" pawn enters the fight with a great effect.} g6 19. Be5 $1 {
[%csl Yf6,Yf8,Yg7,Yh6,Yh8] Diagram [#] Important idea! After the exchange of
the dark-squared bishops, White can make use of Black's weaknesses. At the
same time, the queen is ready to be transferred to the kingside.} ({Premature
is} 19. h5 {, because Black has at his disposal the natural} Bc6 {and white
queen is forced to go backwards.}) 19... Nd5 20. h5 Qe7 21. Qg4 Rfd8 22. Rfe1 {
White has an obvious pressure - the opposition along the "e" file is very
dangerous and the pawn on "g6" is a critical point.} Rac8 23. Nd2 {White goes
for a dubious manoeuvre. He is planning to provoke the exchange of the
dark-squared bishops by means of Ne4, but that threat could be parried quite
easily.} Ba4 24. Rc1 Bg7 $1 {Diagram [#] Diagram [#] Here is the problem! It
becomes clear that to move Ne4 will be met by the simple f7-f5.} 25. Nf3 Be8 $2
{This passive move gives White the possibility to compensate his previous
mistake.} ({More precise was} 25... Rxc1 26. Rxc1 Bb5 $132 {[%cal Gb5e2] With
a counterplay. Black is threatening to play Be2.}) 26. Rxc8 Rxc8 27. Ba2 $1 {
[%cal Ga2d5] Diagram [#] Diagram [#] Just in time! The light-squared bishop
has no work anymore on the "b1 - h7" diagonal. Due to the unprotected position
of Rc8, White is currently threatening to take the knight. The oppoisition
along the "e" file is also very annoying.} Nf6 28. Qh4 Bc6 29. hxg6 hxg6 30.
Ng5 {Diagram [#] A picturesque position! The "h" pawn has completed it's
mission. Now, White's attack is more dangerous than ever.} Bd5 $2 {A mistake
in a very difficult position. However, white can go for rook transfer to the
kingside against pretty much everything.} (30... Re8 31. Re3 $40 {With a
dangerous attack.}) 31. Bxd5 exd5 {White has a fantastic version of the
symmetrical pawn structure. Their attack is unstoppable. I leave the rest of
the game without comments.} 32. Re3 $1 {Diagram [#]} Qd7 ({Or} 32... Qd8 33.
Bxf6 (33. Rf3) 33... Qxf6 34. g3 {[%cal Ge3f3]} Qd6 (34... Qxd4 35. Qh7+ Kf8
36. Rf3 $18) 35. Qh7+ Kf8 36. Nxf7 Kxf7 37. Rf3+ Qf6 38. Rxf6+ Kxf6 39. Qh4+
$18) 33. Bxf6 Bxf6 34. Qh7+ Kf8 35. Ne6+ $1 {Diagram [#]} Qxe6 36. Rxe6 fxe6
37. Qxg6 $18 Ke7 38. Qh7+ Kd6 39. Qxb7 Rc1+ 40. Kh2 Bxd4 41. Qb4+ Bc5 42. Qf4+
1-0



There will be part 3 of this article where we shall see what one needs to do when playing against the isolani. Until then, do not forget to use the promo code dbojkov for 15 % discount on any of the products of "Modern Chess".

18.2.16

Two First-Class Knights

Today's video is featuring an extremely beautiful endgame study, freshly made in my own town Shumen, Bulgaria. The name of the composer-Petromir Panaiotov is worth remembering. Enjoy!

14.2.16

Anand back in Business

After a bad performance in Gibraltar the former world champion Vishy Anand is in his element in Zurich. First he did well at the blitz event, sharing the second place and defeating the sole winner Hikaru Nakamura. Yesterday was even better for him after a convincing start of the rapid part of the event. First there was a blitz-krieg against Aronian:
A game that I liked (ChessBase 13)

[Event "Zürich Chess Challenge 2016"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2016.02.13"]
[Round "1.3"]
[White "Anand, Viswanathan"]
[Black "Aronian, Levon"]
[Result "1-0"]
[WhiteElo "2784"]
[BlackElo "2792"]
[Annotator "Bojkov, Dejan"]
[PlyCount "37"]
[EventDate "2016.??.??"]
[WhiteClock "0:28:15"]
[BlackClock "0:23:36"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. Nc3 {[%csl Gc3,Gc6,Gf3,Gf6] Diagram [#] One
more way to avoid the Berlin- just get into the Four Knights.} Bd6 {A fighting
move. Aronian avoids the heavily explored lines after} (4... Bb4) ({Or} 4...
Nd4 {which both have somewhat drawish reputation.}) 5. O-O O-O 6. d3 Re8 {
One of Black's plans is to transfer the knight to g6 and go for regroupment
with c7-c6 and Bd6-c7. The immediate} (6... Ne7 {however allows the highly
entertaining} 7. Nxe5 Bxe5 8. d4 d6 9. dxe5 dxe5 10. Be3 {with advantage for
White in Michiels,B (2462) -Stefanova,A (2527) Antwerp 2009}) 7. a3 h6 8. Bc4
Bc5 9. Be3 Bxe3 (9... d6 {looks more solid.}) 10. fxe3 {[%csl Yf7,Rg8][%cal
Gf1f7,Gc4f7,Gf3h4,Gh4f5,Rd1f3,Rd1e1,Re1g3] Diagram [#] Now that the "f" file
has been opened White's plan is crystal-clear- Nf3-h4-f5 followed by either
Qd1-f3 or sometimes Qd1-e1-g3 and mate on the kingside.} d6 11. Nh4 ({Also
good is} 11. Qe1 Ne7 12. Nh4 c6 13. Qg3 {with kingside attack in Bicho,
N-Santos,A Aveiro 2003}) 11... Be6 $146 {This is Black's best bet but his
position remains highly suspicious after Anand's reply.} ({The only
predecessor saw:} 11... Na5 $2 {When instead of White could have won with the
beautiful} 12. Bxf7+ $3 {Diagram [#]} Kxf7 13. Qh5+ Kg8 (13... Kf8 14. Rxf6+
Qxf6 (14... gxf6 15. Qxh6+ Kf7 16. Qh7+ Kf8 (16... Ke6 17. Nd5 Nc6 18. Nf5 {
and Black is helpless.}) 17. Ng6#) 15. Rf1) 14. Rxf6 $1 gxf6 (14... Qxf6 15.
Qxe8+) 15. Qg6+ Kf8 16. Qh7 Re6 17. Nf5 Ke8 18. Nd5 $18 {[%csl Ya5,Ya8,Rc7,Yc8,
Yd8,Ye6,Re8][%cal Rd5c7] Diagram [#] and Black cannot parry the threat Nd5xc7+!
}) 12. Nf5 $1 {The knight on f5 is more important than any double pawns on the
"c" file. There will be no endgame!} Bxc4 ({Or} 12... Bxf5 13. Rxf5 {when
White proceeds with his kingside attack and the attempt to bring fresh
defenders with} Ne7 {fails to} 14. Rxf6 $1 gxf6 15. Qh5 Rf8 16. Qxh6 $18) 13.
dxc4 Kh7 14. Qf3 {Diagram [#] The outcome of the opening battle is a failiure
for Aronian. On the top of that he blunders.} Nb8 $2 ({Black is usually trying
to bring a pawn on f6 in these positions. However} 14... Ng8 {will be strongly
met with} 15. c5 $1 ({It is too early for} 15. Nxg7 Kxg7 16. Qxf7+ Kh8) 15...
dxc5 16. Rad1 {with clear edge for White after} Qg5 17. Rd7 Qg6 18. Rxc7 {
[%csl Gc7,Gf1,Gf3,Gf5] Diagram [#]} ({Or} 18. Nd5)) 15. Nxh6 $1 {[%csl Yh7]
Diagram [#] A deadly blow! It is highly unusual to see a top GM losing that
quickly, albeit in a rapid game.} Kxh6 ({Or} 15... gxh6 16. Qxf6 Qxf6 17. Rxf6
{with certain loss in the endgame.}) 16. Qh3+ Kg6 ({Since} 16... Nh5 {loses to
both} 17. g4 ({And} 17. Rxf7 {is very convincing too.}) 17... g6 18. gxh5) 17.
Rf3 Nh5 18. Rf5 $1 {Diagram [#] The final touch.} Nf6 (18... Rh8 19. Qg4+ Kh6
20. Rxh5#) 19. Qh4 {Aronian resigned just a move before the mate.} 1-0




Then came a devilish trick against Giri:
A game that I liked (ChessBase 13)

[Event "Zurich Chess Challenge 2016"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2016.02.13"]
[Round "2.2"]
[White "Giri, Anish"]
[Black "Anand, Viswanathan"]
[Result "0-1"]
[WhiteElo "2798"]
[BlackElo "2784"]
[Annotator "Bojkov, Dejan"]
[PlyCount "92"]
[EventDate "2016.??.??"]
[WhiteClock "0:02:42"]
[BlackClock "0:06:21"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. O-O Nf6 5. d3 d6 6. c3 a6 7. a4 O-O 8. Re1 h6
({A fresh game saw} 8... Ba7 9. Na3 h6 10. Nc2 Re8 11. Be3 Be6 12. Bxe6 Rxe6
13. Bxa7 Rxa7 14. d4 exd4 15. Nfxd4 Nxd4 16. Qxd4 Ra8 {with approximate
equality, So,W (2773)-Mamedyarov,S (2747) Wijk aan Zee 2016}) 9. h3 Be6 10.
Bxe6 fxe6 {[%csl Rf2][%cal Gd8e8,Ge8g6,Rf6h5,Rh5f4,Rf8f2,Rc5f2] Diagram [#]
Funnily, Anand is trying to achieve similar position to the one he had against
Aronian the round before with reversed colours!} 11. Be3 Bxe3 $146 {The
simplest and strongest move.} ({The predecessor saw Black getting into some
trouble after:} 11... Ba7 12. Bxa7 Rxa7 13. d4 (13. b4 $5) 13... exd4 14. cxd4
e5 15. Nc3 $14 {[%csl Gd4,Ge4] Diagram [#] Duexmann,M (1060)-Fraenzel,M (1495)
Solingen 2005}) 12. Rxe3 Qd7 (12... Nh5 {is premature due to the standard trick
} 13. Nxe5 $1) ({But} 12... Qe8 {is perfectly playable.}) 13. Nbd2 ({Normally
White will be happy to advance in the center, but} 13. d4 {allows} exd4 14.
cxd4 d5 15. e5 Ne4 $11) 13... Qf7 14. g3 (14. b4 $5 {Diagram [#] to exapand on
the queenside makes sense as well.}) 14... Nd7 15. Kg2 a5 $1 {[%csl Gb4][%cal
Ga5b4] Diagram [#] Anand can be happy with the opening, he equalized
comfortably.} 16. Qc2 Nc5 17. Rf1 Qd7 18. b3 Ne7 (18... Rf7 {is more obvious,
but Anand's move is more concrete.}) 19. Nc4 b5 {[%csl Rb3] Diagram [#] The
point behind Black's play. He gets counterplay against the b3 pawn.} 20. axb5
Qxb5 21. Rb1 Nc6 22. Ncd2 Rab8 23. d4 {Giri is trying to reduce the pressure
against the b3 pawn.} Nd7 (23... exd4 24. Nxd4 Qb7 25. Nxc6 Qxc6 26. b4 {
is somewhat better for White instead.}) 24. dxe5 Ndxe5 25. Nd4 {Safer was} (25.
Nxe5 Qxe5 26. f4 Qc5 27. Qd3 Qb5 28. Qxb5 Rxb5 {Diagram [#] with approximate
equality.}) 25... Nxd4 26. cxd4 Nc6 27. Qc3 Qb6 {Now the weaknesses are
leveling themselves. The black pawns on c7 and a5 do not look too good, but
neither do d4 and b3 in White's camp.} 28. Nf3 Nb4 29. Qc4 Rbe8 30. Rc1 Rf7 31.
Nd2 $6 {A serious inaccuracy. Correct was:} (31. Ne1 $1 {when} Ref8 32. Qxe6 {
may lead to a sweet draw after} d5 $1 33. exd5 (33. Qxb6 $2 Rxf2+ {is bad for
White.}) 33... Qxe6 34. dxe6 Rxf2+ 35. Kg1 Rf1+ 36. Kh2 R8f2+ 37. Ng2 Rxc1 38.
e7 {Diagram [#]} Rf8 39. exf8=Q+ Kxf8 $11) 31... Ref8 32. f4 $2 {One
inaccuracy leads to a serious mistake.} ({This time} 32. Qxe6 $2 {was bad for
White as the knight on d2 is hanging} d5 $1 33. exd5 Qxe6 34. dxe6 Rxf2+) ({
However} 32. Rf1 $1 {was correct when the game would have remained
approximately even.}) 32... e5 $1 {[%csl Yd4,Re3,Yf4,Rg2] Diagram [#] Anand
immediately spots a tactical possibility and nets a pawn.} 33. Nf3 (33. f5 exd4
) (33. fxe5 d5 $1) 33... exf4 34. gxf4 d5 $1 {[%csl Yc4,Ye4,Rg2] Diagram [#]
And sacrifices is back for activity. The real problem for Giri is not the pawn,
but the horrendous situation of his king.} 35. exd5 Qd6 36. Ne5 Rxf4 37. Kg1 {
The pawn on c7 is taboo due to the knight fork} (37. Qxc7 Qxc7 38. Rxc7 Nxd5
$19 {[%csl Yc7,Ye3] Diagram [#]}) 37... Kh7 (37... Nxd5 38. Rg3 {is less clear.
}) 38. Rg3 R8f5 39. Rg4 {Once more the c7 pawn is invincible:} (39. Qxc7 Rf1+
40. Kh2 R5f2+ 41. Rg2 Qf6 $19 {[%csl Rh2] Diagram [#]}) 39... Qf6 {Anand
energetically conducts the attack.} 40. Rxf4 Rxf4 41. Rf1 Qg5+ 42. Kh2 Re4 43.
Nf3 ({Slightly more resilent is} 43. Rg1 {but this should also lose say after}
Qf4+ 44. Kh1 Qf5 45. Kh2 Re3 46. Qf1 Qxf1 47. Rxf1 Rxb3 $19) 43... Qf4+ {
Diagram [#]} 44. Kg2 Re3 45. Qc1 Re2+ 46. Kh1 Qg3 0-1



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